Tips & News - September 2011

Tips & News - September 2011

ENDURING PRODUCTS AND PEOPLE YOU CAN DEPEND ON.

VOL. 15 NO. 2 | SEPTEMBER 2011 TIPS NEWS www. hubbe l l powe r s y s t ems . com

TIPS NEWS &

Quick fix for frost heave:

HELICAL PILES

®

Shane Vasbinder Civil Engineer Basin Electric Power

Megan Milbradt Civil Engineer Basin Electric Power

Concrete piers were 6 inches to 2 feet out of the ground. Notice the frost heave particularly evident on the pier at right.

Frost heave created major problems at Basin Electric Cooperative’s Logan substation. The busses were at an angle. The light posts were leaning and you could pull some of the fence posts out of the ground by hand. Frost heave was a seri- ous issue at Logan Substation, on the Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Bismarck, North Dakota) system. To compound the problem, the only outages the engineers could get were short and in the spring and fall, when the ground would be thawing or freezing.

2

www.hubbellpowersystems.com

Logan Substation is located on a windswept plain, about 100 miles north of Bismarck, ND, where tem- peratures vary from -40° F in the winter to 100° F in the summer. The frost line is about five or 6 feet down and the soil is mainly clay. The site was wet to begin with and when the substation was built, in 1979, grading (to level the site) created a bit of a depression that was topped with gravel. Drainage has been a serious issue from the start and frost heave has been an ongoing challenge. “Frost heave is a problem throughout the substa- tion; basically everything is moving. Some of the small piers, supporting lights posts, had come up almost 2 feet. It was crazy to see the piers heaved that high out of the ground,” says Shane Vasbind- er, Civil Engineer, Basin Electric Co-op. “The biggest problem was the piers that were supporting the bus-rack structures. The 9-foot concrete piers weren’t rising uniformly and the equipment on the racks was at an angle.”

A Need for Speed In 2010, the situation had gotten to the point that something had to be done, but Basin Electric’s engineers were not sure what to do. They did not want to move the structures or expend the time or effort needed to remove and replace the existing 9-foot concrete piers. One approach the engineers considered was to remove the structures, grind down the existing piers, pour two concrete piers (one on each side) and then install a beam across the two. The structures could then be re-erected in the same spot. While it would work in theory, it was not a practical solution. They would not be able to get the necessary outages needed to pour concrete and let it harden. Getting an outage was going to be a challenge. Basin Electric is a G&T co-op that provides power to 135 member co-ops. Its total territory covers 540,000 square miles and stretches from Canada to Mexico. Member companies provide power to 2.8 million con- sumers in nine states. Logan is a 230kV and 115kV transmission substation, providing power to native load and member co-ops. “Logan Substation feeds a number of critical regions. As the lines go west, they feed all the new oil development areas. We just can’t take extended outages,” says Vasbinder. Besides, the only time dispatchers could arrange an outage was during low-load times (the soonest was in October) — late enough in the year that freezing temperatures and snow storms were a real possibility. Basin Electric needed another solution. “We had used the A.B. Chance (Hubbell Power Systems, HPS) Heli- cal Piles before – to fix transmission structures in the middle of winter – and that looked like our best option. We couldn’t take a long, extended outage to go in and pour concrete,” says Vas- binder. “If we used Helical Piles, we could drill the anchors down and, later that day or the next day, put the structures back up. We could get a whole area done in a week, at most. That was about as long of an outage we could get. Further, we could work in Oc- tober and not worry about heating enclosures for concrete, so we went with the Helical Piles.” Helical Piles: Fast and Winter Friendly To begin, Basin Electric contacted Lee Goen, Senior Chance Anchoring Application Engineer, for help. “The co-op was able to provide all the necessary load information, including vertical

A light post at the station sticking about 18” out of the ground. As the superstructures move, conductors con- nected to them are stretched, including those connected to the substation ground grid.

3

TIPS NEWS &

(or axial) overloads and turning moments. The axial loads were minimal, but, due to strong winds at the site, the moment loads were significant. And, Basin Electric provided bore logs from the site that let me determine the strength of the soil, so I could pick out the right pile,” says Goen. It was possible to replace each foundation with a single Helical Pile, but Basin Electric’s engineers decided to install two, on either side of the original foundation, perpendicular to the frame. They installed a grade beam across the two and re-erected the structures in the original locations. The Helical Piles used at Logan Substation are 14-feet long, consisting of two 7-foot sections, so they could be installed while nearby bus-work was still in place. (That area of the substation was, obviously, de-energized.) An Aggressive Schedule After taking off the top 2 feet of the existing concrete foundation, the contractor installed two

First, spotting the precise location for a Helical Pile’s lead section, then the drive tools engage the box coupler at its top.

Helical Piles — one on either side. Working with the dispatchers, Basin Electric was able to schedule a few outages. The engineers broke the work into phases and hired High Mark (Piedmont, SD) to install the Helical Piles. “The concrete foundations had not heaved at the same rate. Some of them were up more than others. In some less serious cases, we just adjusted the cross members, so that they and the equipment on them were level, again. In more serious cases, we had to replace the concrete piers with Helical Piles and re-install level structures,” says Megan Milbradt, Civil Engineer, Basin Electric Coop. “We decided to focus on the worst foundations, first. We looked at our survey and picked a number of foundations that had heaved

When the lead section is torqued into the ground, the Helical Pile’s baseplate section is added by bolting together their box couplers. Then the proper drive tool is attached and the entire Helical Pile is torqued to grade.

significantly and were in groups. We had one area with eight foundations that were in really bad shape and decided to fix those during the first outage — to see how it went,” explains Milbradt. “We got the first outage in October 2010. It was cold at that time, but the ground wasn’t completely frozen,” says Milbradt.

4

www.hubbellpowersystems.com

After the Helical Piles were installed, a welded grade beam was bolted across the pair. To align the beam’s middle plate so the bus structure could be re-installed where it originally was, a magnetic-base drill was used to locate appropriate bolt holes in the pier bases.

Vertical alignment is maintained by using a carpenter’s level periodically during the process.

“Hubbell Power Systems sent a representative, Jason Herron, out to the field to help us get started and oversee the contractor . . . just in case we ran into any problems, which we didn’t. We have a really good working relationship with Hubbell Power Systems,” says Milbradt. It is not unusual for AB Chance (HPS) to send a representative to a job site, says Jason Herron, Chance Anchoring Application Engineer. “I went out the day before they installed the piles. On the first day, the workers took down the bus work and began demolition of the concrete piers. On the second day, High Mark workers started installing the Helical Piles. I was there to answer any questions and help with the installation, because this particular contractor had

5

TIPS NEWS &

never installed our Helical Piles before. So, I directed them on how to put the tooling together and how to attach it to their drill rig.” “It isn’t hard to get a new contractor up to speed. The biggest thing is working with their equipment. Most people think that whenever you install a Helical Pile, you need a large drill rig or something similar. This contractor came out with this large drill rig and that is not typically what an installer needs. The contractors that install a lot of Helical Piles usually install a torque motor on a skid steer loader, or for these larger diameter piles, they will generally put a higher capacity torque motor on an excavator,” says Herron. “Helical Piles have to be installed at a certain rate— typically eight to 20 revolutions per minute. For every revolution the anchor will embed itself 3 inches into the ground. If you drill too fast, it will have the effect of auguring the hole out. You are actually disturbing the soil and you don’t get the bearing pressure you need. If you go too slowly, you are just wasting your time. At Logan Substation, the equipment (designed to drill holes) was turning a bit too fast. So, we had to work with the

operator to get it slowed down. Typically, this is achieved by adjusting the flow rate on the machine or slowing the RPM or the machine. They made the adjustments and averaged about 14 revolutions per minute,” says Herron. During the first outage, work began on Tuesday and finished on Saturday. In that time, the co-op finished eight foundations and that included removing the structures, jack-hammering out a couple feet of the existing foundations and clearing the site, drilling in the Helical Piles and putting the structures back up. During a second outage in October, Basin Electric Co-op completed work on ten more foundations. Then, winter arrived in earnest and a third outage, scheduled for December, had to be cancelled. The rest of the work will be completed in the spring. “Overall, using the Helical Piles was a good solution for us. Most importantly, we didn’t need long outages. The expense was most likely less than pouring concrete and we didn’t have to pour concrete in cold weather. We got the results we needed,” says Milbradt.

For more information, consult your Hubbell Power Systems terrritory manager or visit http://www.hubbellpowersystems.com/literature/anchoring/

6

www.hubbellpowersystems.com

All the transmission hardware you need bundled and shipped together. It’s fast. It’s easy. It’s just what you need to make your projects go smoothly. With the transmission construction pace increasing across the country, utili- ties are looking for ways to quickly complete projects. We have the answer! When you use our Hubbell TowerPak Kits you cut costs, ensure component compatibility and simplify your scheduling. Versatile, too. You can specify the assembly pack which includes components of one or more assemblies packed together and marked with Hubbell and customer specified assembly numbers. Or, specify the TowerPak with components of all assemblies on a given struc- ture type packed together, palletized and marked with Hubbell and customer- specified structure types.

Parts customized for the specific needs of your projects.

With either approach, the polymer insulator portion of the assemblies for several structures are packed in wood crates in multiples of three, including insulator-shielding corona rings where systems voltages are 230kV and above. Look to our program to give you what you want, how you want it and when you want it at a cost you won’t believe.

Products are packed together to reduce loss of material and speed installation. From factory to field the savings are real.

Call Hubbell Power Systems (573) 682-5521 or contact us at towerpak@hps.hubbell.com.

7

TIPS NEWS &

for Generators & Power Plants SDC™ Solid Dielectric Bushings Electro Composites SDC™ bushings are designed to provide the toughest, cleanest and safest bushing solution for HV applications. We design/build new and replacement bushings for gen- erators, synchronous compensators, GSU transformers, circuit breakers, switchgear, wall/floor pass-through, isolated phase bus ducts, and much more. SDC™ Design Features: Electro Composites ™ solid HV bushings solution

SDC™ (Solid Dielectric Capacitor) one-piece epoxy core & sheds High temperature 130°C insulation - continuous operation Solid dielectric insulation – oil/paper free construction Air-to-air or air-to-hydrogen designs Natural, gas or water cooled Capacitance graded with grounded CT pocket shield Fully testable, with serviceable seals New or “As Existing” dimensional replacements Application Standards: - IEEE C57.19.01, IEC 60137, DIN 48 124 - Customer specification

See Bulletin EC-5 at: http://www.hubbellpowersystems.com/literature/bushings/

SEISMICALLY ENHANCED TEST TERMINALS

®

With a Stronger More Shock-Absorbing Insulator!!

• Has a rated static cantilever strength of up to 2,500 ft-lbs more than 300% higher than existing models • Can absorb high shock loading in excess of 500g’s with side blades in the open position • Available in our 4 most commonly used Test Terminal designs & rated up to 3,000A NEW For more information about PCORE products & services, contact your local Hubbell representative, call our factory at 585-768-1200, or visit: • Regular testing allows you to extend the service life of your equipment while lessening the risk of equipment failure, lost revenue and costly repair & replacement • For use on Power Transformers, Oil Circuit Breakers and SF6 Breakers • No need to physically remove the power bus during testing • Improves worker safety by reducing boom & bucket truck time by up to 60% for the typical maintenance interval SAME GREAT REASONS TO USE

http://www.hubbellpowersystems.com/literature/bushings/

8

www.hubbellpowersystems.com

as easy as pushing a button UPDATED Transmis ion& Substation Connector Catalog Anderson™/Fargo®

&

®

This new Anderson and Fargo Catalog by Hubbell Power Systems has recently been updated. A com- plete reference source for connectors, fittings and hardware. Essential for those engaged in power system transmission.

TRANSMISSION |SUBSTATION connectors

www.hubbellpowersystems.com

Request your catalog by number (TS-1) at hpsliterature@hubbell.com .

Our FORMEDWIRE PRODUCTS Family Is Growing

With 350 Hubbell formed wire products, you don’t need be single-sourced. Look to us as a key supplier for formed wire products. We offer deadends, factory-formed ties, armor rods and line guards, too. Add formed wire products onto any of your Hubbell orders to save on freight and avoid minimum billing you may encounter with other sources. For special requirements, talk with us. We’ll help you design a product solution.

Meets or exceeds NESC 261.

Request additional information at hpsliterature@hubbell.com .

9

TIPS NEWS &

for loading Considerations BRACED LINE POSTS

By R. A. Bernstorf Principal Engineer — Insulators Ohio Brass (by Hubbell Power Systems)

Traditionally, transmission insulators were suspended from tower arms. Because both insula- tors and tower arms serve as mechanical supports, a natural progression was to use insulators to replace structure arms. Initial efforts toward this end involved using line post insulators. The concept is attractive on several fronts. The utilization of line posts as insulating structure arms reduces the overall size of support towers. Additionally, by eliminating the traditional I-string, the design is able to more tightly fix the position of the conductors in space, thus reducing the required right-of-way width and assuring appropriate climbing clearances. Early designs were manufactured with porcelain and were used for voltages 69 kV and below. The designs were gradually expanded to accommodate higher voltages by increasing the length of the insulator. As the section lengths (and applied voltages) increased, the line posts were required to support higher moments. Fortunately, the cross-sections (diameter) of the posts could be adjusted to achieve appropriate cantilever strengths. Unfortunately, the weight of the insulators increased with diameter. Because the primary loading direction of concern was vertical, a triangular structural assembly was conceived that would address the shortfalls of the line post design. The line post and the existing support structure were used as two legs of the triangle. The third leg was created by adding an upward angled brace insulator from the line end of the line post to the tower to buttress the vertical strength and place the line post in a purely compressive loading situa- tion. A universal-joint was included at the ground end of the line post to eliminate cantilever loading of the post member and an offset from the tower face was added to the ground end of the suspension insulator to impart stability. This design was called a Horizontal Vee. It resembles the pivoting horizontal-V, one of three variations of the braced line post shown on the following page. Increased weight concerns were additionally alleviated in the mid-1970s when Non-Ceramic Insulators (NCIs) were introduced. In contrast to porcelain’s high compressive strength, NCIs utilize the high tensile strength capabilities of unidirectional fiberglass rod. The high tensile strength of fiberglass rod allows NCIs to have a relatively small core rod diameter while of- fering equivalent cantilever strength to porcelain. As a result, NCI line posts offer strength equivalent to porcelain at about a third the weight of porcelain line posts. NCI line posts also offer an additional benefit of flexibility in comparison to their brittle porcelain counterparts. Despite any advantages resulting from the substitution of NCIs for porcelain line posts and braced line post assemblies, additional considerations are necessary regarding the loading of these assemblies. Combinations of loading coupled with the flexibility of NCIs make it

10

www.hubbellpowersystems.com

necessary to consider all of these design factors:

Braced Line Post

• Tension loading of the brace insulator string • Compression loading of the line post insulator • Magnitude of the load applied to the line end fitting • Total moment applied to the line post insulator

The modern braced line post design can be varied based on strength and flexibility requirements. The braced line post, pivoting horizontal-V, and horizontal-V are each options to consider in transmission line design. To read more about braced line post design or the use of application curves to evaluate the working range of an assembly, please find a copy of R.A. Bernstorf’s full paper at http://hubbellpowersystems.com/ literature/insulators. The mechanical advantage of specifying a braced line post assembly is its vertical loading capability. Each of the above listed items must be considered with respect to expected vertical loads to ensure the weakest component is not overloaded. The lowest resulting load then becomes the rated vertical capability of the as- sembly. The load magnitude on the line end fitting and the applied moment on the line post insulator will be fairly straightforward constraints. Design considerations are more complex for the first two factors from our list: tension and compression on the brace and post insulators, respectively. Braced line posts are specifically intended for combined loading, meaning that these two factors must be closely considered in assembly design. It is the resultant load of the combined tension and compression that will lend design constraints. Determining tension bearing capability of the brace string would seem simple be- cause the strength of the tensile suspension insulator is typically known. Assum- ing that all of the components of the brace string have rated ultimate strengths equal to or exceeding that of the suspension insulator, the maximum working load of the suspension insulator would be the maximum design tension of the brace. However, there is one caveat to consider in that the loadings cannot ex- ceed the rating of the weakest link in any of the components of the brace string. In designing a braced post assembly, an engineer must be certain to evaluate the tension rating for each component of the brace string before assuming that the suspension’s working load is the only limiting factor. Not only must an engineer account for the components of vertical force on the brace string, but the post’s ability to handle the compressive loads resulting from a vertical load must also be evaluated. An NCI post insulator’s relatively small core rod diameter makes it susceptible to elastic buckling when subjected to large compressive loads. Elastic buckling is, in part, a function of the slenderness ratio (length/radius) for the core rod used in the line post design. While elastic buck- ling may not be an issue for a relatively short line post, it may limit the loadings available for designs intended for voltages above 230 kV. As a guideline, the ap- plied compressive loading on the post should never exceed 80% of the calculated elastic buckling load. Elastic buckling load is calculated from Euler’s buckling equation, which has vari- ables that are best determined empirically. Ohio Brass/ Hubbell Power Systems has performed full scale tests to evaluate the elastic buckling potential of our braced line post assemblies. These tests are detailed in “Composite Braced Line Posts- Mechanical Considerations,” which can be found at the website shown below (highlighted type). A braced line post offers significant performance improvements over a standard line post. However, there are limitations to the capability of the assembly, the foremost being elastic buckling of the line post subassembly. As long as loadings are kept within the constraints of the weakest link of the assembly, mechanical issues should not arise and the improvements in mechanical strength associated with these designs can be employed.

APPROX 62º

Pivoting Horizontal-V

APPROX 50º

Horizontal-V

APPROX 50º

11

TIPS NEWS &

NEW 80K LBS (300KN)

This new Quadri*Sil ® insulator ensures ultimate protection against weather and contaminants, while providing increased mechanical strength for extra high voltage applications. Features include increased strength of a single string to replace a double string to cut costs. Significant weight reduction for easier handling and installation. Replace parallel porcelain strains on high voltage systems. Many advantages over other high voltage insulators including four point sealing system, in- tegral corona shielding ring, proprietary silicone-rubber compound and uniform circumferential crimp method for enhanced insulator integrity.

We've Updated Our EHV SUBSTATION CATALOG

This updated Anderson™ EHV Substation Catalog is a must for those planning, building and maintain- ing substations. A complete reference source for terminals, couplers, tees, Bus supports and more from Hubbell Power Systems. Request your FREE

copy of Bulletin AEC-16 at hps.literature@hubbell.com.

4 12

www.hubbellpowersystems.com

®

Hydraulic Crimping Tools Offer Many Advantages

Choose VC63SP and VC6FTSP Crimping Tools to work better and easier at less cost. New two-stage pump design gives faster nib closure. VC63SP offers extended range to 750mcm AL/CU. Head rotates 360 degrees. Direct reading pressure gauges available. Use on any manufacturer’s wire size for wire size compression connectors qualified to ANSI C-119.4, Class A2, A3.

NEW Class 2 Rubber Blanket

Cover up for 17kV maximum use. Meets ratings per ASTM Spec D1048. Type 1 non-ozone-resistant. Proof tested at 20kV AC rms. Flexible, durable, versatile offering easy handling and cleaning.  For complete details on Chance Black Class 2 Blankets, request Sup- plemental Catalog Bulletin 2412.1 at hpsliterature@ hubbell.com. For details on Chance Orange Class 4 Blankets, see Chance Hot Line Tool catalog page 2409 or request a copy of a Chance Hot Line Tool Catalog at hpsliterature@hubbell.com.

13

TIPS NEWS &

Hubbell Electric Utility Enclosure Catalog NEW

This new Electric Utility Enclosure catalog by Hubbell Power Systems is a complete reference for Quazite ® Underground

Enclosures, Hubbell Equipment Pads, and Hubbell Above-ground Enclosures used by utilities. Using both polymer concrete and fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP). Hubbell Enclosures produces products that offer many advantages over common concrete. Enclosures Line Card. NEW A Quick Overview of Hubbell Enclosures

Request your copy of Catalog HUC-E at hpsliterature@hubbell.com.

This new Product Line Card by Hubbell Power Systems gives a quick overview of the many products offered for Electric Utilities including Secondary Pedestals, Sectionaliz- ing Cabinets, Shelters, Vaults, Trench Covers, RoadPlate and Shoring Systems. Also shows many solutions for Pad-Mounted Equipment from Hubbell as well as Quazite® Under- ground Enclosures.

Request your copy of Bulletin HUC-10 at hpsliterature@hubbell.com.

14

www.hubbellpowersystems.com

FORM AND FUNCTION Finally . . .

Faster installation with the Integral Jacket Seal Elbow

Our latest innovation in Cable Accessories, available in 15kV and 25kV. All-inone design seals the outer jacket of an underground cable, completely eliminating the need for separate seal kits. Flared cable entrance of the elbow reduces installation forces and provides each elbow with expanded cable insulation ranges. External hooks and a flared seal entrance provide an improved grip and installation helping linemen pull the seal over the mastic during installation.

15

TIPS NEWS & Hubbell TIPS & NEWS magazine is pub- lished to inform personnel of electric utilities and associated companies of new ideas and techniques in transmission and distribution practices. The magazine, under different titles and formats, has been published since 1932. Your suggestions and editorial or photo- graphic contributions are invited and may be submitted to Hubbell TIPS & NEWS.

®

HUBBELL TIPS & NEWS 210 N. Allen Street

Presorted Standard U.S. POSTAGE PAID

Centralia, MO 65240-1395 USA ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

Lawrence, KS Permit No. 116

©Copyright 2011 Hubbell Inc.

UNITED STATES, CANADA & INTERNATIONAL • 210 N. Allen  • Centralia, MO 65240  • Phone: 1-573-682-5521 • Fax: 1-573-682-8714 • E-mail: hpsliterature@hubbell.com MEXICO • S.A. DE C.V. • Av. Insurgentes Sur # 1228, Piso 8 • Col. Tlacoquemecatl Del Valle • Mexico, D.F. 03200 • Phone: 52-55-9151-9999 • Fax: 52-55-9151-9988 NOTE: Because we have a policy of continuous product improvement, we reserve the right to change design and specifications without notice.

VOL. 15 NO. 2 | SEPTEMBER 2011

w w w . h u b b e l l p o w e r s y s t e m s . c o m

Hubbell 2012/2013 Wall Calendars FREE

2012

JANUARY

SUN

MON

TUE

FEBRUARY

WED

1

THU

2

FRI

3

SAT

4

5

SUN

8

6

MON

9

7

TUE

10 17 24

MARCH

WED

11 18 25

THU

12 19 26

15 22 29

FRI

13 20 27

16 23 30

SAT

14 21 28

1

2

SUN

5

3

MON

6

4

TUE

7

WED

8

THU

9

12 19 26

FRI

10 17 24

13 20 27

SAT

11 18 25

14 21 28

31

15 22 29

1

4

16 23

2

5

3

6

7

8

11 18 25

9

12 19 26

10 17 24

13 20 27

14 21 28

APRIL

15 22 29

16 23 30

SUN

MON

TUE

WED MAY

WED

1

THU

2

FRI

3

SAT

31

4

5

SUN

8

6

MON

9

7

TUE

10 17 24

JUNE

11 18 25

THU

12 19 26

15 22 29

FRI

13 20 27

16 23 30

1

SAT

14 21 28

2

3

SUN

6

4

MON

7

While supplies last…. 2012 on one side and 2013 on the other gives you two full years of calendar reference. 17x24 size for high visibility. These calendars are extremely popular and go fast, so place your order today for you and your co workers.

5

TUE

8

WED

9

THU

10 17 24

13 20 27

FRI

11 18 25

14 21 28

SAT

12 19 26

15 22 29

16 23 30

3

1

4

2

5

6

7

10 17 24

8

11 18 25

9

JULY

12 19 26

13 20 27

14 21 28

31

15 22 29

16 23 30

SUN

MON

TUE

AUGUST

WED

1

THU

2

FRI

3

SAT

4

5

SUN

8

6

MON

9

7

TUE

10 17 24

SEPTEMBER

WED

11 18 25

THU

12 19 26

15 22 29

FRI

13 20 27

16 23 30

SAT

14 21 28

1

2

SUN

5

3

MON

6

4

TUE

7

WED

8

THU

9

12 19 26

FRI

10 17 24

13 20 27

SAT 1

11 18 25

14 21 28

31

15 22 29

2

16 23 30

3

4

5

6

9

7

10 17 24

OCTOBER

8

11 18 25

12 19 26

13 20 27

16 23 / 30

14 21 28

31

15 22 29

SUN

MON

TUE

NOVEMBER

WED

THU

1

FRI

2

SAT

3

4

SUN

7

5

MON

8

6

TUE

9

DECEMBER

WED

10 17 24

THU

11 18 25

14 21 28

FRI

12 19 26

15 22 29

SAT

13 20 27

16 23 30

1

SUN

4

2

MON

5

3

TUE

6

WED

7

THU

8

11 18 25

FRI

9

12 19 26

SAT 1

10 17 24

13 20 27

14 21 28

2

31

15 22 29

3

16 23 30

4

Request your calendar at: hpsliterature@hubbell.com.

5

6

9

7

10 17

8

11 18 25

12 19 26

13 20 27

16 23 / 30

14 21 28

15 22 29

24 / 31 Anderson ™ CDR ™ CHANCE ® Electro Composites ™ Fargo ® Hot Box ® Ohio Brass ® PCORE ® Polycast ® Quazite ® USCO ™

Never Compromise www.hubbellpowersystems.com TM

Allen 10/11

Made with FlippingBook - Online magazine maker